Defence Jobs

Australia

Air Force engineers lead an engineering team to help create and deliver Australian Defence Force (ADF) capability by applying engineering principles to acquire, sustain, maintain, and manage technology. They work on state aircraft, infrastructure, weapons, ancillary technical equipment and related aviation ground combat support systems like RADAR, SONAR, IT and networks; and operate within a defined engineering management framework comprising relevant ADF regulations and procedural guidance.

As an Engineer in the Air Force you would be able to be employed in roles where you are responsible for regulation, design, project management, logistics support and technical maintenance, to ensure technology is safely, efficiently and effectively employed to generate the required ADF capability. Additionally, as an Officer you are also responsible for the leadership, management, and welfare of technical and logistics personnel within the engineering environment.

Three of the Aerospace Engineer specialisations have similar roles. These are:

Aeronautical (AERO) – responsible for aircraft structures, propulsion and associated mechanical systems and ground support equipment.

Armament (ARMO) – responsible for weapons, weapons systems and associated test equipment and bomb disposal; and

Electronic/Electrical (ELECTR) – responsible for airborne power generation and distribution, electronic/electrical control systems, instrument and navigation systems, automatic test equipment, communications, and radar and sonar equipment, heavy ground radar, ground telecommunication equipment and computer networks. ELECTR Officers can further specialise into aircraft related systems or Ground telecommunications related systems.

After you complete Initial Officer Training you will undertake a Professional Development and Training (PDT) year during which time you will rotate around different roles on a base every few months and undergo your employment training. After completing your PDT year, your first or second posting will likely be Maintenance Engineering or Engineering Management. You will be posted and rotated around new roles approximately every 3 years to gain the depth and breadth of experience required to develop you as a competent engineering leader with increasing levels of responsibility along the way.

Roles of an Aerospace Engineering Officer

The roles of Aerospace Engineers (AERO, ARMO and ELECTR) include:

Maintenance Engineering. Your initial employment in the Air Force would usually be as the officer in charge of a team of technical personnel and facilities associated with day to day maintenance and equipment overhaul at either a maintenance unit, or flying squadron. You will be one of up to half a dozen junior engineers under the guidance of the Senior Engineering Officer, responsible for contributing to the availability of airworthy aircraft or associated equipment by ensuring safe work practices and that other regulatory requirements are met. A flying squadron usually presents opportunities for travel and participation in operations and exercises in Australia and overseas.

Engineering Management. A posting to an Engineering Management role usually involves working in a Systems Program Office (SPO) within the Defence Material Organisation (DMO). SPOs provide engineering and logistics support to wings, squadrons and units. During the service life of an aircraft or item of technical equipment, Air Force Aerospace Engineers may lead a team to: monitor failure; evaluate proposed modifications and repair schemes; supervise and evaluate equipment trials; manage repair contracts; liaise with regulatory authorities; prepare financial estimates; and provide technical and logistics solutions to operational availability issues. To assist in those tasks you will have access to external organisations where you will liaise closely with your civilian counterparts. An engineering management role presents a great opportunity to build systems knowledge and work towards gaining Chartered Professional Engineering status with Engineers Australia.

Project management. As you progress through your career you can be posted into project management roles. These are typically within the DMO and involve either the engineering and maintenance aspects of large acquisition projects (e.g. the purchase of new aircraft and associated weapon systems), or as the manager of a specific engineering or maintenance project (e.g. the F/A 18 Hornet Upgrade Project) within a SPO. Project management roles often present opportunities for travel and the development of your business acumen.

Design Engineering. The Air Force needs professional engineers to sign off on the integrity of a system or piece of equipment to ensure continued airworthiness and safety. You may be posted to a position within a SPO, a regulatory authority, or a niche role (e.g. aerial delivery, operational test and evaluation etc) where you will develop your engineering authority so that you can make technical decisions on engineering changes such as software upgrades, modifications to equipment, system safety, and the approval of structural repairs to name a few. Later in your career, design engineering roles give you the opportunity for overseas Masters Programs sponsored by the technical airworthiness regulatory authority.

Any officer roles. Officers in the Air Force may also undertake a posting to an Any-officer role at some stage during their careers. Examples include instructor/training roles and staff officer roles. This helps to broaden the skill set of an Engineering Officer in preparation for more senior roles.

With the constant introduction of new aircraft (Joint Strike Fighter for example) and equipment to Air Force, life as an Aerospace Engineering Officer is constantly challenging and changing. The Air Force provides many internal courses as well as offering the chance of post-graduate training, workshops and seminars at external institutions to help you meet these new challenges throughout your career.

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Defence Jobs

Australia

Since the earliest days of flight Aeronautical Engineers have designed, constructed, and developed the science of aircraft and spacecraft. The Australian Army is looking for Aeronautical Engineers to be part of the largest helicopter operator and the second largest aircraft fleet operator in Australia. As an Aeronautical Engineer, you will be part of a team responsible for developing new and exciting capabilities within the Defence Force such as the Armed Reconnaissance Helicopter, the Chinook, Black Hawk and Multi-Role Helicopter platforms.

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Defence Jobs

Australia

As an Electronics Engineer (Electronics Engineer Officer) you will be one of the Navy’s electrical, electronics and combat systems engineering experts. You will also be responsible for ships’ communications, radar, sonar, navigation, combat data, fire control and weapons systems. While at sea you will be the engineering authority on board the ship and responsible for the efficiency, effectiveness and safety of the ship’s diverse combat and self-defence capabilities. In shore based positions you will perform duties in support of the fleet including system specification, acquisition and through-life support, system certification, combat system trials and the training and management of sailors and officers.

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Defence Jobs

Australia

In the Navy, Aerospace Engineering Officers are divided into two specialisations: aeronautical engineers (termed Aeronautical Engineering Officers) and electronics aircraft engineers (termed Weapons Electrical Aircraft Engineering Officers). There is much commonality between the two specialisations, and many positions are open to Officers of either specialisation.

Both specialisations are primarily responsible for managing the maintenance and airworthiness of the Navy’s helicopters, but as a Weapons Electrical Aircraft Engineering Officer, your expertise will lie in helicopter electrical systems, communications systems, navigation systems, weapons systems and software.

As an Aerospace Engineering Officer, your defining role will be as a maintenance manager and technical expert at one of the Navy’s Fleet Air Arm helicopter squadrons, or in the Aviation Engineering Department on one of the Navy’s amphibious assault ships.

As a maintenance manager at a Fleet Air Arm squadron, you are responsible for helping maintain the airworthiness of the Navy’s helicopters, by leading and advising technical sailors, planning helicopter maintenance, managing resources to rectify unserviceable aircraft and assuming responsibility for one or more of the technical aviation departments, such as the maintenance, logistics, training, safety or quality departments.

As an engineer on one of the Navy’s Canberra Class amphibious assault ships, you are responsible for managing the ship’s aviation engineering department, which is tasked to maintain the ship’s aviation facilities and also provide equipment and support to Australian Defence Force aircraft and aviation personnel when they embark onboard the ship.

Aerospace Engineering Officers also have the opportunity to experience many different aspects of engineering. Examples of other roles in which Aerospace Engineering Officers are employed include:

Engineering support performing minor design work, certification, fleet management, logistics management and contract management

Policy and regulation development

Project management for the acquisition of new aircraft and equipment

Auditing maintenance standards

Trialling and testing aircraft design changes and new aircraft

Instructing and managing aviation training

Limited opportunities are also available for specialist roles in safety investigation, flight test engineering and aircraft structural integrity management.

To help you meet these challenges, the Navy provides many internal courses, a recognised professional development program leading to the award of Certified Practicing Engineer (CPEng) and opportunities for postgraduate education throughout your career.

All junior Officers onboard RAN vessels will be required to keep Officer of the Day (OOD) duties. The OOD is the Commanding Officers (CO) representative for a 24 hour period and is directly responsible to the CO for the safety and security of the ship and personnel onboard.

In addition to their normal duties, all Naval Officers will be designated as Divisional Officers throughout their career. This involves the leadership, management, administration and career advice to junior Sailors and Officers within their Division which may involve up to fifty junior sailors and officers.

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Defence Jobs

Australia

In the Navy, Aerospace Engineering Officers are divided into two specialisations: aeronautical engineers (termed Aeronautical Engineering Officers) and electronics aircraft engineers (termed Weapons Electrical Aircraft Engineering Officers).

There is much commonality between the two specialisations, and many positions are open to Officers of either specialisation. Both specialisations are primarily responsible for managing the maintenance and airworthiness of the Navy’s helicopters, but as an Aeronautical Engineering Officer, your expertise will lie in helicopter structures, materials, engines and aerodynamics.

As an Aerospace Engineering Officer, your defining role will be as a maintenance manager and technical expert at one of the Navy’s Fleet Air Arm helicopter squadrons, or in the Aviation Engineering Department on one of the Navy’s amphibious assault ships.

As a maintenance manager at a Fleet Air Arm squadron, you are responsible for helping maintain the airworthiness of the Navy’s helicopters, by leading and advising technical sailors, planning helicopter maintenance, managing resources to rectify unserviceable aircraft and assuming responsibility for one or more of the technical aviation departments, such as the maintenance, logistics, training, safety or quality departments.

As an engineer on one of the Navy’s Canberra-class amphibious assault ships, you are responsible for managing the ship’s aviation engineering department, which is tasked to maintain the ship’s aviation facilities and also provide equipment and support to Australian Defence Force aircraft and aviation personnel when they embark onboard the ship.

Aerospace Engineering Officers also have the opportunity to experience many different aspects of engineering. Examples of other roles in which Aerospace Engineering Officers are employed include:

Engineering management, performing minor design work, certification, fleet management, logistics management and contract management

Policy and regulation development

Project management for the acquisition of new aircraft and equipment

Auditing maintenance standards

Trialling and testing aircraft design changes and new aircraft

Instructing and managing aviation training

Limited opportunities are also available for specialist roles in safety investigation, flight test engineering and aircraft structural integrity management.

To help you meet these challenges, the Navy provides many internal courses, a recognised professional development program leading to the award of Certified Practicing Engineer (CPEng) and opportunities for postgraduate education throughout your career.

Additional Duties

In addition to their normal duties, all Navy Officers will be designated as Divisional Officers throughout their career. This involves the leadership, management, administration and career advice to junior sailors and Officers within their Division which may involve up to fifty junior sailors and Officers.

All junior Officers onboard RAN vessels will be required to keep Officer of the Day (OOD) duties. The OOD is the Commanding Officers (CO) representative for a 24 hour period and is directly responsible to the CO for the safety and security of the Ship and personnel onboard.

They’ll also be engaged in managing the general maintenance and upkeep of their Navy vessels and equipment as part of the larger team.

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Defence Jobs

Australia

As a Marine Engineering Officer you are the technical expert on board ships and are responsible for the ship’s structures, propulsion systems, electrical generation and distribution, and domestic and associated mechanical services. Responsibilities also include the main and auxiliary machinery, engines, automatic and remote control systems, hydraulics, air conditioning and refrigeration, ventilation systems and electrical power generation and conversion equipment.

In shore based positions you will perform duties in support of the fleet including system specification, acquisition and through-life support, system certification, machinery trials and the training and management of sailors and Officers.

During the service life of ships Marine Engineers monitor failure, develop and evaluate proposed modifications and repair schemes, and supervise and evaluate equipment trials. To assist in these tasks you will have access to external organisations where you will liaise closely with your civilian counterparts.

Marine Engineers are heavily involved with resource management, assigning and scheduling personnel, assets, equipment and finances to the task at hand. Ashore, you could be responsible for the provision of financial estimates or the progression of technical works requirements or maintenance programs.

As the Navy regularly introduces new ships and systems, life as a Marine Engineer Officer is constantly challenging and changing. To help you meet these new challenges, Navy provides many internal courses as well as offering the chance for postgraduate training at external institutions throughout your employment.

Additional Duties

In addition to their normal duties, all Navy Officers will be designated as Divisional Officers throughout their career. This involves the leadership, management, administration and career advice to junior sailors and Officers within their Division which may involve up to fifty junior sailors and Officers.

All junior Officers onboard RAN vessels will be required to keep Officer of the Day (OOD) duties. The OOD is the Commanding Officers (CO) representative for a 24 hour period and is directly responsible to the CO for the safety and security of the Ship and personnel onboard.

They’ll also be engaged in managing the general maintenance and upkeep of their Navy vessel and equipment as part of the larger team.

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Royal Australian Air Force

Australia

Officer, Graduate, Australian Defence Force Academy, Officer (Reserve), Undergraduate

Logistics is a key component of Air Force capability. It is integral to the mounting and sustainment of operations, and enables what is operationally possible. Logistics Officers (LOG) plan, establish, coordinate, maintain and manage logistics support and supply chain activities that contribute to capability and operations support in aerospace and joint military operations.

Logistics Officers perform their duties on units and bases throughout Australia, in Headquarter posts and in overseas localities. Your duties as a Logistics Officer are diverse. You could find yourself responsible for the acquisition, sustainment and support of modern and valuable equipment vital to Air Force capability. Depending on your role you may also be responsible for the supervision and management of airmen and airwomen from the Supply, Movements and Cook musterings or civilian and/or contractor staff. Additionally, Logistics Officers frequently liaise with members of the other Services, foreign services, contractors, and civilians within the broader ADF.

The roles and functions undertaken by Air Force Logistics Officers span from the tactical to the strategic level across the single Service, joint and combined arenas. Logistics Officers also utilise specialist skills (provided through training in the Air Force) and are employed in a range of roles including: Capability Support – Acquisition and Sustainment Logistics, Project Management, Operations Support – Operational Logistics, Supply Chain and Inventory Management, Warehousing and Distribution, Procurement and Contracting, Movements and Transportation, Catering Management and Logistics Policy, Planning and Governance.

Further details on the roles and functions undertaken by Air Force Logistics Officers are available here .

Typically, junior Logistics Officers will progress through a range of roles and develop a broad foundation of logistics skills. Your responsibilities will be well defined, and you can expect them to increase as you gain experience and progress in rank.

You will be expected to participate in the effective management of your Unit, both in your professional role as a Logistics officer, and as a junior executive responsible to your Commanding Officer. As well, you will also be expected to develop networks on and off base in order to broaden your professional network and maintain an awareness of what is happening within Air Force and Air Force Logistics more broadly.

You may be employed in various working conditions, ranging from field operations in remote locations within Australia or overseas, to a standard office environment. However, during the conduct of some tasks or field deployments, you may be exposed to extremes of climate and some hazardous environments. The criticality of some logistics and operational support tasks may also necessitate you working for long periods of time at short notice.

Outside of your normal duties, opportunities are available for sporting and social activities and your membership of the Officers Mess on your base will introduce you to other officers whose interests and activities will complement yours.

In summary, the Logistics Officer specialisation is extraordinarily broad and therefore offers a range of exciting and challenging professional experiences.

Entry

Officer

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Royal Australian Air Force

Australia

Officer, Australian Defence Force Academy, Graduate, Undergraduate

As a Personnel Capability Officer (PCO) you could be employed in a range of roles within the Air Force and the wider Australian Defence Force (ADF). One of the most common jobs for junior Personnel Capability Officers is to be a Unit Staff Officer Personnel, however, this would only be a part of a diverse and challenging career. A few of the roles a Personnel Capability Officer can enjoy throughout their career are outlined below.

Staff Officer Personnel (SOPERS)

As a Unit SOPERS, you are one of the Unit executives with a wide variety of responsibilities including human resource and complex case management, information and knowledge management, internal and external corporate communication, financial budgeting, reporting and governance tasks. In operational units, you are not only responsible for ensuring Unit personnel are trained and ready for operational deployment but their welfare (as well as their families) is well looked after.

You will work closely with support specialists, such as Service chaplains, doctors, psychologists and social workers while providing support to Unit members. You will often work directly to the Unit’s Commanding Officer (CO) providing not only specialist advice but you and your staff will have key roles in maintaining the Unit’s information and financial accountability.

Personnel Operations

Personnel Capability Officers have a number of opportunities to be posted to roles that directly support operations.

Personnel Operations roles are those jobs primarily concerned with identifying, preparing and supporting personnel from across the Air Force or the wider ADF to deploy on operations. You will ensure the right people are deployed at the right time. There are opportunities to work in the Personnel Operations domain across a number of levels of command and within a tri-service environment.

You may also be involved in both long-term and short-notice planning for large-scale military operations or humanitarian crisis situations.

Strategic Communication

Personnel Capability Officers are commonly involved in planning and executing internal and external communication strategies during their posting to an SOPERS position. However, there are a number of jobs which specialise in communication.

You may work in public relations and manage a number of high-level events and community engagement activities not just for your unit or base but also on the national stage. There are growing opportunities in media liaison and public affairs as well as social media and website content management.

Workforce Development and Review

There are some opportunities for Personnel Capability Officers to undertake workforce development, design and implementation across all levels of command. These roles involve being responsible for workforce planning, effecting organisational change and assisting commanders and their personnel to adapt to change.

You can be involved in the development and delivery of Air Force’s current and future workforce. You may also be involved in designing and implementing ‘people initiatives’ aimed at generating workforce savings to fund future capabilities.

You may like to work with Air Force’s ‘workforce structure’. In such roles you would be responsible for balancing workforce capability requirements within resource constraints and plan the future shape of the workforce for emerging capabilities.

Deployments

Whenever Air Force personnel deploy on operations, a Personnel Capability Officer is usually one of the first on the ground. Personnel Capability Officers maintain Air Force’s most valued assets, its people, not just from a capability perspective but from a welfare perspective as well.

Personnel Capability Officers can also deploy as a Staff Officer to commanders and provide specialist advice as well as undertake a number of unique roles to the deployed environment, including Civil-Military Cooperation and Host Nation liaison, Key Leader Engagement and Public Information activities.

Entry as an Air Force Personnel Capability Officer is available through the Australian Defence Force Academy, or as a Direct Entry Officer (including Reserve Officer) or commissioned from within the Air Force.

Officer (Reserve)

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Australian Army

Australia

Australian Defence Force Academy, Undergraduate, Graduate
The function of an aeronautical engineer is as old as aircraft itself. Employment in this function involves the design, construction, and science of aircraft and spacecraft. While not yet involved in trying to master outer space, the Australian Army is looking for aeronautical engineers to look after the second largest aircraft fleet operator, and the largest helicopter operator, in Australia. As an Aeronautical Engineer, you will be responsible for new and exciting capabilities within the Defence Force such as the Armed Reconnaissance Helicopter, the Chinook, Black Hawk and Multi-Role Helicopter platforms.

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Royal Australian Air Force

Australia

Australian Defence Force Academy, Graduate, Undergraduate, Graduate (Reserve)
The mission of the Air Force Airfield Engineering Specialisation is to provide appropriate infrastructure for the conduct and sustainment of effective combat and related air operations to the Air Force. To achieve this mission the Airfield Engineering Specialisation requires the ability to deploy both onshore and overseas to provide their vital enabling functions for the projection of Air Force’s core air power capability.

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